Bumblebee blog

Here you will find informal updates on our projects, top tips from our staff and volunteers on how to support bumblebees and interesting guest articles from our partners. Use the category buttons to filter the blog articles by topic.

Should you take a bumblebee home?

 by Jack Reid, Outreach and Volunteering Officer at Bumblebee Conservation Trust

So, you kidnapped a bumblebee…

Each year, the Trust receives dozens of e-mails and phone calls from well-intentioned beenappers who have been out and about and found a tired-looking lone bumblebee that they’ve rescued and taken home with them to care for. In case you’ve been considering the practicalities of taking a bumblebee home, we have written up this useful guide to caring for your new friend, without taking it home! Read More

Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #10 Bombus brodmannicus

by Denis Michez, Researcher at Université de Mons, Belgium and contributor to the IUCN RedList assessment for several European bumblebee species.

This month Bumblebees of the World features Bombus brodmannicus, a poorly understood and endangered bumblebee species found in two fragmented populations separated by more than 2,500km!

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Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #9 Bombus gerstaeckeri

by Denis Michez, Researcher at Université de Mons, Belgium.

September’s blog features a vulnerable European bumblebee species, Bombus gerstaeckeri, and comes from Denis Michez, a researcher at Université de Mons, Belgium, who studies global bee diversity and conservation.

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Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #8 Bombus eximius

By Chawatat Thanoosing, PhD student and Paul Williams, researcher at the Natural History Museum London

This month we’ll explore a deep montane tropical forest in Asia, where Chawatat Thanoosing— a PhD student at Imperial College London and the Natural History Museum—is doing his research on the ecology of tropical bumblebees, to see the remarkable giant bumblebee, Bombus eximius.

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Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #7 Bombus inexspectatus

by Darryl Cox, Senior Science & Policy Officer.

July’s Bumblebees of the world blog features the endangered Bombus inexspectatus, literally an unexpected European bumblebee, first described by Tkalcu in 1963, which has been found to parasitize on the Red-shanked carder bee (Bombus ruderarius). This species is one of two bumblebees, outside of the typical cuckoo bumblebee group (discussed in last month’s blog) to have evolved a parasitic way of life.

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Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #6 Bombus rupestris

by Darryl Cox, Senior Science & Policy Officer.

Bumblebees of the world would not be complete without delving into the darker side of bumblebee life, and so this month features one of around thirty described parasitic cuckoo bumblebees, the Red-tailed cuckoo (Bombus rupestris).

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Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #5 Bombus cullumanus

by Paul Williams, Researcher at the Natural History Museum, London, and Darryl Cox, Senior Science & Policy Officer.

This month, Bumblebees of the world returns from across the Atlantic to feature Cullum’s bumblebee (Bombus cullumanus), a Eurasian species which is sadly no longer found in the UK and has experienced drastic declines across the rest of Western Europe.

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Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #4 Bombus fraternus

by Darryl Cox, Senior Science & Policy Officer

The Southern Plains bumblebee (Bombus fraternus) features in this month’s Bumblebees of the World blog, with a particular focus on how the species’ endangered conservation status was classified by the  IUCN’s Bumblebee Specialist Group (BBSG).

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World’s biggest bee rediscovered

By Cathy Horsley, Bumblebee Conservation Trust Conservation Officer for the West Country Buzz project.

An enormous bee with a 64 mm wing span that was thought to be extinct has been rediscovered this year. Wallace’s bee, Megachile pluto, was first known to science in 1859 when it was described by Alfred Russel Wallace. It was last seen in the 1980s, but was found recently by researchers to be alive and well on the Indonesian Maluku Islands. When insects are rare, or found in very specific types of habitat, they can go undetected; in this case for decades.

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Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #3 Bombus affinis

By Elizabeth Franklin, Bumblebee Researcher, Guelph, Canada

This month's Bumblebees of the World blog is written by Bumblebee Researcher, Elizabeth Franklin, from the University of Guelph, who focuses on the plight of a critically endangered bumblebee in North America.

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