Bumblebee blog

Here you will find informal updates on our projects, top tips from our staff and volunteers on how to support bumblebees and interesting guest articles from our partners. Use the category buttons to filter the blog articles by topic.

Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #4 Bombus fraternus

by Darryl Cox, Senior Science & Policy Officer

The Southern Plains bumblebee (Bombus fraternus) features in this month’s Bumblebees of the World blog, with a particular focus on how the species’ endangered conservation status was classified by the  IUCN’s Bumblebee Specialist Group (BBSG).

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A brief guide to bee nest boxes

Bex Cartwright, our Making a Buzz for the Coast Conservation Officer, has written this handy guide on how to create or choose a suitable bee box to make a perfect home for solitary bees in your garden! Read More

Oxford Real Farming Conference

At the start of January delegates from across the food and farming sectors converged at the 10th annual Oxford Real Farming Conference (ORFC) – a conference set up to champion sustainable farming, food production and land stewardship. Set up as an alternative to the Oxford Farming Conference, which has been running since 1936, the Oxford Real Farming Conference has soared in popularity since its inception in 2010. Read More

In the village of Penparcau . . .

By Chloe Griffiths, a keen BeeWalker in west Wales who has worked with her local community to improve bumblebee recording data and local pollinator habitat.

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Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #3 Bombus affinis

By Elizabeth Franklin, Bumblebee Researcher, Guelph, Canada

This month's Bumblebees of the World blog is written by Bumblebee Researcher, Elizabeth Franklin, from the University of Guelph, who focuses on the plight of a critically endangered bumblebee in North America.

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Shrill carder bee project blog

by Rosie Earwaker from Buglife, Back from the Brink’s Shrill Carder Bee Project Officer

Hints of spring are in the air. Bulbs are peeking up through the soil, with plenty of snowdrops, daffodils and crocus already in flower. Sightings of Buff-tailed bumblebees in gardens are more and more frequent as the days grow longer. It won’t be long now until different bumblebee species join them, although we will have to wait a couple more months until the high pitched buzz of our Shrill carder bee returns. It certainly won’t be a silent spring this year, but where will we be in 100 years’ time?

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Bumblebees of the World Blog Series… #2 Bombus transversalis

by Darryl Cox, Senior Science & Policy Officer

This month our bumblebee world tour stays in South America, although we are heading north from Patagonia into the Amazon basin, where our species in the spotlight is the Amazonian bumblebee, Bombus transversalis.

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Brown-banded carder and Moss carder bees in North Devon

by Patrick Saunders

Patrick Saunders (Kernow Ecology) conducted a field survey commissioned by BBCT’s West Country Buzz Project in summer 2018. This was to assess the current status and conservation requirements of Brown-banded Carder bee and Moss Carder bee in North Devon, in partnership with other West Country Buzz project surveys.

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Bumblebees of the World . . . #1 Bombus dahlbomii

by Darryl Cox, Senior Science & Policy Officer

There are around 250 species of bumblebees across planet Earth, stretching across most of the Northern Hemisphere, from the arctic, right down to the southern-most tip of South America in the Southern Hemisphere. Each bumblebee species has a different distribution and all are an important part of life within their ecosystems. By transferring pollen that helps plants set fruit and reproduce, they are involved in the base layers of numerous food chains, which provide food and shelter for a great multitude of living things (including ourselves).

This year, we have decided to show our appreciation for some of the most beautiful and diverse bumblebees from across the world in our monthly Bumblebees of the World blog series, and what better way to start our series than with one of the world’s largest and most iconic bumblebees: Bombus dahlbomii.

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Farmer Cluster Conference November 2018, Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust

Conservation Officers Cathy Horsley and Daisy Headley attended the second Farmer Cluster conference, which was held in Birmingham and attended by 250 farmers, advisors, and representatives from the conservation sector. Farmer Clusters are groups of neighbouring farmers working together to encourage wildlife on their farms, helping to join up habitats across the landscape. The ideas are farmer-led, and are co-ordinated by a facilitator. There are now 100 Farmer Clusters in England, and are aided by Natural England’s Facilitation Fund.

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